35 Minerals Absolutely Critical to U.S. Security

Visual Capitalist  |

35 Minerals Absolutely Critical to U.S. National Security

35 Minerals Absolutely Critical to U.S. National Security

The Chart of the Week is a weekly Visual Capitalist feature on Fridays.

What do cobalt, uranium, helium, titanium, and fluorspar have in common?

According to the U.S. government, these are all minerals that are deemed critical to both the economic and national security of the country.

The draft list of 35 critical minerals was released on February 16, 2018 as the result of President Trump’s Executive Order 13817, which asked the U.S. Department of the Interior and the Secretary of Defense to publish a list of mineral commodities that are vital to U.S. interests.

Under the Executive Order, a critical mineral is defined as:

A non-fuel mineral or mineral material essential to the economic and national security of the United States, the supply chain of which is vulnerable to disruption…

The list includes minerals that are important for defense, economic, and industrial purposes – and it keys in especially on minerals that are not produced in substantial quantities domestically.

Why These Critical Minerals?

We sorted the list based on some of the key uses of these minerals.

Critical Minerals by Use

Click to enlarge

Of course, some of these minerals could belong in multiple categories: for example, vanadium is used as a steel and titanium alloy strengthener, but also in rechargeable vanadium flow batteries.

That said, the important commonality to note for all of these minerals is their crucial link to the U.S. economy and national security.

Preparing for the Worst-Case Scenarios

Imagine the hypothetical impact of a lack of uranium for nuclear plants, a hampered ability to create high-strength steel and superalloys for the U.S. military, or if U.S. auto manufacturers had limited access to aluminum, steel, PGMs, and battery metals.

The challenge, as U.S. federal authorities realize, is that many of these raw materials are produced in limited amounts domestically. In fact, according to the USGS, the country sources at least 31 of the aforementioned materials chiefly through imports.

While it is unlikely that these supply chains would ever be disrupted, it’s never a bad idea to prepare for the worst-case scenario.

Stock price data is provided by IEX Cloud on a 15-minute delayed basis. Chart price data is provided by TradingView on a 15-minute delayed basis.

DISCLOSURE: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors, and do not necessarily represent the views of equities.com. Readers should not consider statements made by the author as formal recommendations and should consult their financial advisor before making any investment decisions. To read our full disclosure, please go to: http://www.equities.com/disclaimer.

Trending Articles

Remote and Hybrid Work Is Boosting Commercial Air Travel
Silicon Valley ‘Open Secret’ Means Buy This World-Class Tech Stock
Natural Gas and Energy: Expect Dramatic Price Swings Near-Term
The Boulevard of Broken Dreams
Prepare For the December Oil Shock
Next Phase of Pharma Growth: Generics
Three Slam-Dunk Opportunities as the Inflation Nightmare Weakens
T-Mobile Was First to 5G Data, But Forgot Voice: Jeff Kagan

Market Movers

Sponsored Financial Content